MI and WFP renew partnership to improve nutrition for women and children in developing countries

Ramiro Lopes da Silva, WFP Assistant Executive Director (left) and Joel Spicer, MI President and CEO, signed a Letter of Understanding renewing the two organizations' partnership to improve nutrition and food security for vulnerable people globally.

Ramiro Lopes da Silva, WFP Assistant Executive Director (left) and Joel Spicer, MI President and CEO, signed a Letter of Understanding renewing the two organizations’ partnership to improve nutrition and food security for vulnerable people globally.

OTTAWA, CANADA ― The Micronutrient Initiative (MI) and the World Food Programme (WFP) signed a Letter of Understanding on November 4, 2016, renewing their partnership to improve nutrition and food security for vulnerable people ― especially women and children ― globally.

With this current four-year agreement, MI and WFP will put a special emphasis on innovative approaches to deliver effective solutions to malnutrition by working in four specific areas: nutrition research and evidence creation, knowledge management, advocacy to influence policy at all levels, and technical assistance to support countries’ nutrition scale-up programs.

“MI is delighted to strengthen our partnership with WFP, an undisputed global leader in nutrition and food security,” said MI President and CEO Joel Spicer. “We’ve learned from our common experience that, by combining our forces and capabilities, we can increase benefits to the people who need it most. This renewed collaboration will also further strengthen and establish Canadian leadership in the area of nutrition, which has been possible thanks to years of generous support received from the Government of Canada.”

“At WFP we know we cannot reach Zero Hunger alone, we need strong partnerships. This important agreement with MI will bring together the comparative strengths of two agencies focused on improving nutrition in some of the most challenging environments around the world,” said Ramiro Lopes da Silva, WFP’s Assistant Executive Director. “Working together on tackling micronutrient deficiencies and other forms of malnutrition, our combined efforts can be a significant contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals.”

Today, the Government of Canada is the second largest donor to global nutrition, and a main supporter to MI as well as the WFP.

“Malnutrition is a problem of massive scale that requires concerted action, and we know that working in partnership is one of the best ways to eradicate it,” said Amy Baker, Director General of Health and Nutrition, Global Issues and Development Branch at Global Affairs Canada. “Global Affairs Canada is therefore pleased to see two of Canada’s key partners in nutrition and food security joining forces, bringing together their knowledge and expertise to deliver smarter and faster solutions to end malnutrition.”

For more than a decade, WFP and MI have collaborated on the development and implementation of a number of low cost, high impact interventions, including food fortification to reduce anaemia in adolescent girls and women of reproductive age as well as birth defects in newborns in Pakistan and Bangladesh, and projects to improve the use of micronutrient powders in school meals in order to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in pre-school and school-aged children in Haiti.